General

Won’t accept any unjust demand by US: PM Khan

Prime Minister Imran Khan vowed on Friday that his government would not to accept any unjust demand by the United States.
The prime minister said so during his meeting with TV anchors, which also had Foreign Minister Shah Mehmood Qureshi and Information Minister Fawad Chaudhry in presence.
Khan welcomed criticism of his government telling TV talk show hosts that criticism does not puzzle him, it rather helps resolving issues.
The premier, however, said that his government should be given three months to deliver and then be criticised openly.
He noted that Pakistan’s circular debts had reached Rs1200 billion, maintaining that the country could not progress without accountability.
The prime minister said he had directed National Accountability Bureau (NAB) chief to carry out indiscriminate accountability and take action even if a member of the government was also involved in corruption.
During the meeting, he openly supported Usman Buzdar saying that the Punjab chief minister should be given three months’ time, after which the media should criticise him for his performance.
Commenting on his use of helicopter, Khan said he has been using it to save people from mobility issues.
Regarding his team, he said that he was not responsible for the past of individuals he had inducted in his team. “They have been conveyed that any irregularities would not be tolerated now.”
The prime minister said that none of his cabinet members was appointed permanently and could be shuffled on the basis of performance. About foreign tours, he said these were not his priority.
Speaking with regard to Pakistan-US ties, he said his government would not accept any unjust demand by the United States.
Khan said they could not fight the US, but they will improve their ties with Washington. He added that Pakistan also seeks peaceful relations with India, Afghanistan and Iran.
Regarding his visit to the Pakistan Army’s General Headquarters, he said the visit went well and it was conveyed that the government had backing from the institution.
The prime minister further vowed that his government would cancel the agreements made against national interest.